Spina Bifida

Spina bifida is a congenital neural tube defect where there is an incomplete closing of the backbone and membranes around the spinal cord.

Spina Bifida

Spina bifida is a congenital neural tube defect where there is an incomplete closing of the backbone and membranes around the spinal cord. Normally, the neural tube forms early in the pregnancy and closes by the 28th day after conception.

Spina bifida is a congenital defect as a result of an insufficient development of baby’s spine and spinal cord in the womb, causing a gap in the spine.

The severity of this birth defect can vary to a large extent meaning that this gap can be so small that it does not cause any significant or visible problems or it can be so big that it can be a cause of a significant amount of disability.

Spina bifida can developed anywhere on the spine, on one or more vertebrae, but it is most common on the waist level. In most cases it develops on the thoracic, lumbar or sacral segment of the spine and usually includes 3 to 6 vertebrae.

The severity of spina bifida is graded from spina bifida occulta (without any visible defects) to visible defects like those including a sac or cyst (spina bifida cystica) and an entirely open spinal cord (rachischisis) with serious neurological consequences and possible death.

Such a cleft can also have a negative impact on the bladder, causing a vesicoureteral reflux and hydronephrosis, frequent urinary infections and ultimately an irreversible kidney damage. Where this medical condition is concerned, the prognosis depends on the severity of spina bifida and other medical issues caused by it. However, a special care is a presupposition of success.